Apartments in River North Chicago

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River North

A Chicago Neighborhood

Summary

Experience the Magnificent Mile & Michigan Avenue in Chicago’s River North

Chicago was incorporated in 1837 on waterways--for trading--and was re-built in 1871 after the Chicago Fire. The area known today as River North contained warehouses, shipping facilities, railroad tracks, worker’s housing, factories and forges. Because of the number of factories--and the smoke they produced--the area was referred to as Smokey Hollow. When the port was closed the area fell into disrepair as the warehouses and factories vacated and residents moved to the suburbs. From the 1920s through the 1960s it was almost deserted and became known as a red-light district. As artists began to reclaim the large vacated buildings for relatively little money, they turned the old warehouses and factories into galleries, studios, offices and apartments. Real estate developer Albert Friedman coined the name River North to help the area lose its reputation as a derelict district.

River North now has the largest concentration of art galleries outside of Manhattan and a revitalized entertainment industry. It is also home to international corporations such as ConAgra, Groupon and Motorola. The eastern border is Michigan Avenue; the northern edge is Chicago Avenue and the Chicago River is on the south and west perimeters.

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Who Lives There

The current population is 27,160 with the median income listed as $105,495. The median home and condo price is $346,200. 47% of the residents in River North have a bachelor’s degree and 35% have a master’s or higher. There is a more decisive curve to resident’s ages in River North than some other neighborhoods throughout Chicago. Only 7% are under the age of ten, 1% fall into the 11-19 group and a mere 9% are 65+. The average age in River North is 31.5.

Budget

If you're not sure how much an apartment will cost, the table below shows the average price by size.

$1,467
Studio
$1,891
1 Bedroom
$2,437
2 Bedrooms
$2,892
3 Bedrooms
$3,248
4 Bedrooms
$3,474
5+ Bedrooms

Places of Interest

River North is a vibrant area of Chicago, sporting a huge number of galleries, restaurants and night spots. You will find iconic architecture like the 330 North Wabash skyscraper, designed by Mies van der Rohe and the Richard H. Driehaus Museum, known as the Marble Palace. The neighborhood’s most famous spot is the Mart, with high-end interior design studios that shoppers from all over the world seek out. The outside of the building has the world’s largest video projection art installation and can be seen each evening. Dining and drinking is a 24 hour affair in River North, from high to low end.

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Chicago:
October Rent Report

Welcome to the October 2020 Chicago Apartment Report. In this assessment of the local rental market, ABODO data scientists and rental experts break down the October 2020 key findings and figures for the Chicago rental landscape.

Our experts analyze the pricing trends — one-bedroom, two-bedroom, year-over-year and month-over-month — in Chicago and surrounding areas and provide comparisons to the entire metro area, nearby cities and some of the most desirable and expensive cities in the United States. Take a look at the last 12 months of Chicago rent prices in the chart below.

Monthly Rent Report

Chicago Rent Prices Decrease From September to October

Chicago rent prices decreased over the last month. From September to October, the city experienced a -1.34% decrease for the price of a one-bedroom apartment. The rent price for a Chicago one-bedroom apartments currently stands at $1,697.0.

When we take a look at the two-bedroom comparison from September to October, Chicago experienced a -0.3% decrease for the price of a two-bedroom apartment. The rent price for a Chicago two-bedroom apartments currently stands at $1,979.0.

October Prices: Chicago vs. Surrounding Areas

Rent Prices in Chicago and Surrounding Areas

Rent prices have decreased in Chicago over the last month. But how have the surrounding areas fared when it comes to the recent volatility in apartment prices? Rent prices in 3 of the Chicago suburbs increased last month. On the other hand, 3 local areas experienced a decrease in the price of a one-bedroom apartment.

More key findings include:

  • Rent increased in Naperville, IL, Hoffman Estates, IL, Schaumburg, IL .

  • Rent decreased in Oak Park, IL, Evanston, IL, Lombard, IL.

  • 2 suburbs are currently priced higher than the city of Chicago.

  • 4 suburbs are currently priced lower than the city of Chicago.

October 2020 Pricing Trends: Chicago vs. National Comparisons

Chicago Rent Prices More Affordable Than Major Cities

Rent growth in Chicago over the past year has been declining. When compared to major cities nearby, along with some of the most expensive cities in the country, Chicago rent prices appear to be relatively affordable for local residents.

The price for a Chicago one-bedroom apartment remains vastly more affordable than four of the largest cities in the United States — New York City, Washington, D.C. San Francisco and Los Angeles. And pricing compares quite similarly to nearby Midwest cities.

You can view the full rundown of ABODO's October 2020 National Apartment Report and data set here.

For more information about Chicago and surrounding area rent prices, take a look at the complete data set below.

Data set for Chicago and suburbs

1 BR October 1 BR M/M % Change 2 BR October 2 BR M/M % Change
Chicago, IL $1,720.0 -0.81% $1,985.0 0.05%
Oak Park, IL $1,101.0 -0.27% $1,609.0 0.63%
Evanston, IL $1,918.0 -1.64% $1,925.0 -5.50%
Naperville, IL $1,313.0 0.77% $1,671.0 -0.71%
Hoffman Estates, IL $1,340.0 0.75% $1,555.0 0.65%
Lombard, IL $1,724.0 0.00% $2,547.0 1.31%
Schaumburg, IL $1,374.0 1.40% $1,590.0 0.44%

Methodology

Each month, using over 1 million ABODO listings across the United States, we calculate the median 1-bedroom and 2-bedroom rent prices by city, state, and nation, and track the month-over-month percent change. To avoid small sample sizes, we restrict the analysis for our reports to cities meeting minimum population and property count thresholds.